Is your organization getting the most value out of Enterprise Imaging?

We all understand the basics of a successful project. Make clear goals, put a team in place to execute on them, measure success. Then lather, rinse, and repeat, right? Somehow, though, many health systems are not finding this formula to be effective for their Enterprise Imaging (EI) initiatives. Three factors may be contributing. 1. Not having the right mix clinical/business/technical voices on the project  EI initiatives give organizations real opportunities to improve patient care quality and to reduce costs (of both patient care and technology). To take full advantage, it is essential that the project team views the EI project foremost as a clinical and business quality improvement project, supported by technology, rather than a technology project. Often, project teams don’t have the right range of resources engaged (or in some cases available) to approach the project from this strategic perspective.   Effective EI projects include: Executive level governance to articulate the organization’s strategic goals, to set project direction. Clinical participation from service lines that generate, consume, and exchange images. Business and operational staff that can describe the health system’s objectives. Technical staff that can act as translators and configure the software to address the requirements these groups describe. Let’s take one example.  How does your organization think of one important element of an EI project – the large archive(s) of medical images. Is it a costly burden to be managed, or a clinical asset to be mined for AI insights? Or is it a business asset to be monetized working with an AI partner? In all likelihood it is all of these things. Without the right mix of staff and levels...
Enterprise Imaging: Value Proposition & Image Exchange

Enterprise Imaging: Value Proposition & Image Exchange

We (the Image Exchange subgroup of the HIMSS-SIIM EI work group) published our first white paper in June, during SIIM 2016 in Portland.  It’s called Considerations for Exchanging and Sharing Medical Images for Improved Collaboration and Patient Care.  (Yes, we know, it’s a mouthful.) It outlines clinical and financial benefits of a sound image-exchange strategy as a component of your Enterprise Imaging plan, and we hope it is helpful to you. Moving forward, I’ll be collaborating with Dr. Chris Roth,Vice Chairman of Radiology, Information Technology and Clinical Informatics a Duke University Medical Centerto co-chair a new subgroup: The EI Value Proposition.  We are lucky to have some very thoughtful people participating in the subgroup with us. While the value of EI is apparent to many of us, lots of organizations are still trying to make sense of it and understand its value.   We plan to provide real-world success stories, lessons learned, and tools to help those just getting started to evangelize and quantify EI value. Some EI value points to consider… Eliminating Redundant Systems and Costs Imaging needs of service lines like pathology, the emergency department, ophthalmology, and dermatology often fly under the radar of IT. They may purchase redundant storage systems, pay redundant systems support fees, and pay for redundant resources to support their own data solo.  Many can be eliminated or consolidated, and provide meaningful savings. Reducing HIPAA Vulnerability These same service lines may use existing cameras, mobile phones, and desktop computers to capture and manage images. The Health and Human Services HIPAA Breach reporting page lists health systems that were fined up to $850,000 for HIPAA breaches might have been avoided with EI. Laptops...
Enterprise Imaging: Value Proposition & Image Exchange

Enterprise Imaging: Value Proposition & Image Exchange

We (the Image Exchange subgroup of the HIMSS-SIIM EI work group) are publishing our first white paper during SIIM.  It’s called Considerations for Exchanging and Sharing Medical Images for Improved Collaboration and Patient Care.  (Yes, we know, it’s a mouthful.) It outlines clinical and financial benefits of a sound image-exchange strategy as a component of your Enterprise Imaging plan, and we hope it is helpful to you. Moving forward, I’ll be collaborating with Dr. Chris Roth to co-chair a new subgroup: The EI Value Proposition.  We are lucky to have some very thoughtful people participating in the subgroup with us. While the value of EI is apparent to many of us, lots of organizations are still trying to make sense of it and understand its value.   We plan to provide real-world success stories, lessons learned, and tools to help those just getting started to evangelize and quantify EI value. Some EI value points to consider…   Eliminating Redundant Systems and Costs Imaging needs of service lines like pathology, the emergency department, ophthalmology, and dermatology often fly under the radar of IT. They may purchase redundant storage systems, pay redundant systems support fees, and pay for redundant resources to support their own data solo.  Many can be eliminated or consolidated, and provide meaningful savings. Reducing HIPAA Vulnerability These same service lines may use existing cameras, mobile phones, and desktop computers to capture and manage images. The Health and Human Services HIPAA Breach reporting page lists health systems that were fined up to $850,000 for HIPAA breaches might have been avoided with EI. Laptops and cameras have been stolen – devices that contained clinical photographs of skin and CT scans...

Enterprise Imaging: 5 Reasons Why It Is Time For Your Organization To Start Planning For It

Vendor neutral archive (VNA) and the concept of “deconstructed PACS” are somewhat vague and abused terminologies that mean different things to different people. However, as this collection of technologies matures, strategic opportunities exist to eliminate data silos and introduce EMR-based and exchange workflows that include all types of imaging. This is collectively categorized as Enterprise Imaging (EI). Here are 5 reasons to start planning for EI: Newly implemented EHRs provide the foundation for specialized workflows that include all images: Your EHR implementation is either well underway or perhaps in place. Immediately after go live, even the most successful EHR implementations are blunt instruments when it comes to workflow and data capture. The process of fine-tuning workflows to improve patient care and efficiency and convenience for the care teams really begins after go live. Image-enabling the workflow with a spectrum of DICOM and non-DICOM images as well as outside documents is crucial and requires an EI strategy. New technologies bring patient-context to the diagnostic workflow: The new and quickly embraced FHIR standard is changing the interoperability game. Diagnostic workflows can use FHIR to communicate with the EHR. Radiologists and image-intensive clinicians can make diagnostic interpretations and treatment decisions with the entire patient record or condition-relevant summaries available, helping to reduce errors and expedite care delivery. Others have gone before you: EI early adopters are shaping the very definition of EI and it’s requirements. They’ve identified the right parameters of EI, and have contributed to a valuable library of lessons learned and emerging best practices. This is not to say that an EI journey is straight forward or without complications. But...